Boy doing homework.

A good homework routine – introduction

Posted on Posted in Positive parenting

 

Boy doing homework. Sad child

A good homework routine – introduction (1/6)

As a life coach I talk with many children, parents and teachers every week. My observation is that the single biggest cause of disruption at home is the homework routine.

I don’t want to talk about if homework is right or wrong or if they have too much or too little. I want to talk about how to make that time a lot more enjoyable for everybody.

But let’s start with some assumptions

1- Many days, if not most days, your children have regular homework to do at home

2- Many days, if not most days, an adult sits with them when doing the work

3- Many days, if not most days, the work takes a lot longer than the normal 30mins that the school recommends

4- Many days, if not most days, the children don’t remember how to do things, lose concentration, ask the same questions many times

5- Many days, if not most days, the adult suffers some level of frustration ranging from mild to severe

6- Many days, if not most days, the adult finishes the homework routine in a less than happy mood

7- Many days, if not most days, the children finishes the homework routine in a less than happy mood.

If you can say “yes” to at least 4 out of the 7 assumptions above, please continue reading.

I have another assumption. Most of you reading this article will agree with everything that comes next, but most of you will not act on it. I know it, It has happened before and it will happen again. I am fine with it as it is your choice. However, let’s face it, when the children reach secondary school you won’t be able to help them. You’ll probably be out of your depth and the amount of work will be too much. At that time, those children will have to learn to work by themselves and, in many cases, it will take them a long time to do so.

And I have a fact for you. Those that follow these recommendations tend to answer, many days if not most days, “no” to the majority of the questions above.

Having said all this, here are the key stages to work towards

Stage 1: be clear on what the goal of homework is

Stage 2: defining the rules in a mature way

Stage 3: implement without exception

Stage 4: make improvement and reward them

Stage 5: be proud, enjoy it and think on the next project

If you are diligent with the approach you will see results in the first 4-6 weeks. The routine will be adopted and working very well within 3-4 months. I advice to start with this routine in year 3, but anytime is a good time. If you have children in different years, it is very much the same with some small variations.

I will publish the articles over the course of December 2016